House of Cards

My wife was reading a discussion on whether the Lord’s Supper has to be celebrated every Sunday or not. One preacher wrote that if the Lord’s Supper wasn’t required every Sunday the church would collapse with people only attending once or twice a year.

Beside the fact that that argument is irrelevant to what the Bible teaches about the Lord’s supper, I totally agree with the preacher. The hardline Churches of Christ are often so boring and demoralizing that people would quit attending if they thought they were safe. So many churches are built around listening to a judgemental preacher with low self-esteem preach every Sunday for 35 to 55 minutes (the longer the sermon, the lower the self-esteem). These are men who were not listened to as children. So they found a captive audience who is required to attend every Sunday to take the Lord’s supper, and they make the congregation listen to them for as long as the congregation will tolerate without the risk of getting fired.

I also agree with the hardline preacher that everything has to remain the same for the hardline churches to survive. If even one element of doctrine changes it removes a card from the house and all the cards fall down. The understanding of baptism is essential to keep the Churches of Christ separate from all other groups. The doctrine of weekly observance of the Lord’s Supper keeps everyone attending weekly. The doctrine of the Insecurity of our Salvation is essential to keep everyone attending regularly. Take one of those cards out and the house falls down.

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About Mark

I was raised in the conservative non-institutional churches of Christ and attended Florida College in Tampa, Florida. I served as a minister for 8 years in the non-institutional churches of Christ, and 4 years at a mainline church of Christ in Vermont.
This entry was posted in Command, Example and Necessary Inference, History and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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